"27 Dresses" – Girls Night Out

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Hey Friends. Just wanted to write about the best time I’ve had in a while with a group of women. My husband and I recently began attending small groups/life groups in our church. A great way to get connected to a church of over 12,000 members.

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Our group leader for couples set up a Girls Night Out for Friday. And, I figured no time like the present to jump in and get to know them. We had a grand time, the movie was wonderfully funny and a little refreshing. Not to give anything away, but the reviews are mostly deeming it “cliche.” However, I thought it was a good story about two people with wounds who find out that what they thought they were looking for is not at all what life is all about. Actually, three if you count George, but that is all together another story.
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Beyond the cliche of the story there was regular perusal of alcohol and several bar scenes. A smattering of suggestive sexual content – which had real world type consequences, and a handful of swear words. It was funny, insightful and you could see the growth of the characters during the course of the movie. This movie reminded me of “While You Were Sleeping” with Sandra Bullock.
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Go and enjoy the movie! Take some girlfriends and connect!
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Rated: PG-13Runtime: 1 hr 47 mins
Theatrical Release: Jan 18, 2008 WideBox Office:
$70,649,785
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(This review is from the Plugged In Movie Review at Focus on the Family’s Website)
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Penned by Aline Brosh McKenna (who also wrote the screenplay for The Devil Wears Prada), 27 Dresses is a sassy, sometimes crass, sometimes poignant celebration of marriage. It’s got foul language. It’s got inappropriate sex. It’s got drunken karaoke. But it doesn’t confuse carnal relations with committed relationships, and that in itself is fairly refreshing in a cinematic world most often devoted to brainless, lesson-less Will Ferrell or Vince Vaughn comedies.
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When they first meet, Kevin tells Jane that “believing in marriage is like believing in Santa Claus.” It’s a hypocritical spectacle, this “last legal form of slavery,” he says, the sole purpose of which appears to be to prop up a battalion of overpaid wedding planners, event caterers and cake decorators. It rarely lasts, so what’s the point?
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Statistics suggest that a growing number of Americans agree with Kevin—their actions showing that they somehow believe marriage is an old-fashioned idea with little relevance in today’s changing culture. According to a report from Rutgers University, the percentage of folks getting married has been nearly cut in half since 1970. And the number of cohabiting couples has jumped from half a million to nearly 5.5 million in that same time period.
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Jane doesn’t buy it. She absolutely refuses to give up on her conviction that weddings—those celebrations that can be solemn, spiritual and whimsical all at once—are an acknowledgement of the power of love, and a promise to forever nurture, foster and celebrate that love.
In the end, even Kevin understands. And that’s no laughing matter for a comedy these days.

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Genre: Comedies
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Starring: Katherine Heigl, James Marsden, Malin Akerman, Edward Burns, Melora Hardin, Judy Greer

Director: Anne Fletcher
Screenwriter: Aline Brosh McKenna
Producer: Roger Birnbaum, Gary Barber, Jonathan Glickman
Composer: Randy Edelman

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